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The Brass Junkies Podcast - Pedal Note Media

The Brass Junkies, hosted by former Boston Brass members Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke, features interviews with the best and brightest brass players in the world. Subject matter includes everything from the serious to the ridiculous, just like the music business.
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Now displaying: Category: The Brass Junkies
Jun 11, 2019

TBJ113: Rebecca Cherian on encouraging young women players, the importance of allies and the Bernstein Bounce. Rebecca Cherian is Co-Principal Trombone of the Pittsburgh Symphony.

From her bio:

Rebecca Cherian was awarded the position of co-principal trombone of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra by Lorin Maazel in 1989. She has been trombone instructor at Carnegie Mellon University since 1993. Cherian was a founding member of the International Women’s Brass Conference in 1994 and served as the IWBC Newsletter Editor for five years. 

As a California native, Cherian began her professional career at the age of 16 as trombonist with the San Jose Symphony under the direction of George Cleve. At the age of 17, she appeared as a soloist with the San Francisco Symphony as a result of winning First Prize in their Young Musicians’ Awards. Cherian earned her Bachelor of Music Degree from the California Institute of the Arts and her Master of Music Degree from the Yale School of Music. While in school she was awarded First Place in the Atwater Kent Brass Competition and Outstanding Chamber Music Performer at Yale. She studied with Miles Anderson, Robert Szabo, and John Swallow.

Before becoming a member of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Cherian held positions of principal trombone with the Springfield Symphony in Massachusetts and the Rhode Island Philharmonic. She was trombone instructor at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, the Hartt School of Music and Wesleyan University. As a freelance artist, she toured with the Israel Philharmonic under the Direction of Leonard Bernstein, performed with the Boston Opera, New York City Ballet, Hartford, New Haven, and Vermont Symphonies and Goodspeed Opera House.

In September 1993, Cherian enjoyed the honor of performing at the White House in Washington, D.C. as part of a 15-woman ensemble of brass and percussion players for the opening reception of the Annual International Women’s Forum. The group performed the world premiere of Joan Tower’s fanfare, Celebration, which was dedicated to Hillary Clinton. Cherian appears regularly as a soloist and master class Clinician at the IWBC.

Cherian released her second solo CD, “L’Invitation au Voyage,” in 2015. Both her first CD, “Water Awakening,” and “L’Invitation au Voyage.” are available through cdbaby.com or amazon.com. She can also be heard on “From the Back Row,” a recording on Albany Records of the Low Brass Section of the Pittsburgh Symphony and numerous recordings of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Lorin Maazel, Mariss Jansons and Manfred Honeck.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:
  • The dramatic Rebecca/Becky controversy
  • Playing with the PSO
  • The recent PSO concert at Lincoln Center in NYC
  • Technical difficulties
  • Becky still has a home phone (thankfully!)!
  • The state of the PSO
  • How social media played a part in getting the word out about the PSO player's positions
  • Her first gig was in San Antonio Symphony at 16 years of age
  • Losing her slide story
  • Women in the career field, how things have changed and what work there still is to do
  • The importance of building allies in a group
  • How to coach and encourage young women players (and the men too!)
  • Diversity issues in general
  • Picking the instrument in school, despite trombone not being a "girl's" instrument
  • Soloing with the San Francisco Symphony at 17
  • Lance's monumental frack 
  • Playing under Bernstein with the Isreal Philharmonic on tour in Mexico and Texas (and learning Rite of Spring and bass trumpet in one day)
  • Meeting Bernstein
  • Bernstein falling off the podium (and bouncing back), AKA the "Bernstein Bounce"
  • Herp Alpert
  • Playing at the White House

Links:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

May 28, 2019

TBJ112: Matt Neiss on The Capital Bones, 3 x 3, and getting help from the "Trombone Angel."

Matt Niess is a cross over trombonist who served with The U.S. Army Band in Washington, DC and currently serves as Adjunct Associate Professor, Classical and Jazz Trombone at Shenandoah Conservatory.

From his bio page:

Matt Niess is a cross over trombonist who served with The U.S. Army Band in Washington, DC from 1988-2018 where he played with The Army Blues and The Army Brass Quintet. He is from Levittown, PA where he attended Woodrow Wilson High School. He earned an undergraduate degree in Instrumental Music Education from West Chester University in 1988, a Masters degree in classical trombone performance from George Mason University in 1996 and a DMA in classical trombone performance from The Catholic University of America in 2015.

He was director of bands at Calvert High School in Prince Frederick, MD from 1986-1988, and has taught on the jazz faculties of Shenandoah, George Mason, and Towson Universities.  He also served as director of jazz studies and professor of trombone at West Chester University from 2003-2007. Currently, he is the professor of jazz trombone at George Mason University and professor of trombone at The Shenandoah Conservatory teaching both jazz and classical. With The Army Blues he has served as Senior Producer and Jazz Coordinator of the Eastern Trombone Workshop producing over 300 concerts at various venues ranging from The White House to the Monterey Jazz Festival.

In 2008 he founded the National Jazz Workshop which runs two summer camps and sponsors a year-round honor band. To date over 1,000 students have participated in “NJW”. The year-round band has performed at The Kennedy Center, The Jazz Education Network, New Orleans, St. Louis, Dallas, Blues Alley, and numerous jazz festivals. He is the founder and director of The Capitol Bones, a jazz trombone ensemble, which has received national recognition and was winner of the 1991 International Trombone Association Kai Winging Award.

He has appeared as a soloist, clinician, and adjudicator at numerous venues including The Midwest Band and Orchestra Clinic, IAJE, JEN, ITA, ETW, MENC, PMEA, VMEA, University of Las Vegas, University of North Texas, West Virginia University, Disneyland & Disneyworld All-American College Band, James Madison University, UARTS, University of Utah, The Nebraska Jazz Orchestra, Longwood College, The U.S. Air Force “Noteables”, Mary Washington College, Shepherd College, University of Kentucky, University of Texas, George Mason University, University of Wisconsin, Towson University, University of North Carolina, Shenandoah University, Longwood College, West Chester University, University of Tennessee and others.

With The Army Band he has performed with Clark Terry, Doc Severinsen, Bill Watrous, Phil Wilson, Conrad Herwig, Carl Fontana, Don Menza, Chris Potter, John Clayton, Alabama, Rany Travis, Ertha Kitt, Allen Vizutti, Jon Faddis, The New York Voices, Terrell Stafford, Michael Abene, Dave Steinmeyer, Steve Turre, Tim Hagens, John Swana, James Moody, Buddy DeFranco, Dr. Billy Taylor, Bob Curnow, Mike Tomaro and many others.  Venues include  numerous Universities, schools and jazz festivals, I.A.J.E., ETW, The Midwest Band and Orchestra Clinic, MENC, The Montreux Jazz Festival, The Monterey Jazz Festival, Elkhart Jazz Festival, International Trombone Festival, National Trumpet Competition, The Trumpet Guild, Performances abroad include Germany, Switzerland, Kuwait, Uzbekistan, Russia, Cuba, Afghanistan, Norway and Sweden.

As a sideman he has performed with Ray Charles, Franky Valli, Pancho Sanchez, Shirley Jones, The Temptations, Diane Shuur, Joan Rivers, The Ink Spots, Merv Griffin, Mel Torme, Frank Sinatra Jr., Ben Vereen, The Four Tops, The Manhattan Transfer, Pia Zadora, The Smithsonian Masterworks Orchestra, David Baker, Bobby Caldwell, The Rob Parton Jazz Tech Big Band, The Gene Krupa Orchestra, Slide Hampton and many others.

He has produced CDs with The US Army Blues Jazz Ensemble, The West Chester University Criterions Jazz Ensemble, The Capitol Bones and The Capitol Bones Big Band and has appeared on many recordings to include The Mark Taylor/Steve Fidyk Big Band, The New Gene Krupa Orchestra, The Alan Baylock Big Band, Graham Breedlove, Doug Hamilton, The Mike Tomaro Big Band, over 100 recordings with The Studio A Big Band and The Washington Winds, Warner Bros. Publications, Alfred, FJH Music, Carl Fischer Music, Belwin Publications and Hal Leonard Publications. He has also recorded soundtracks for FOX TV, HBO, Discovery, and TLC.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • Earbuds
  • From Houston to West Chester
  • Army Band
  • Lance is bad at math (3x7+3=? hint: not 30)
  • Becoming a band director in Frederick MD
  • Meeting the Navy Commodores and finding out about the Army Blues gig
  • Learned jazz
  • In his mind, he's 6'2"
  • Preparing for the Army Blues audition
  • Getting help from the "Trombone Angel"
  • Replacing Harry Watters in the Army Brass Quintet
  • Do everything three times, three times a day
  • Teaching at Shenandoah
  • Saddled with a work ethic
  • USAF Band stories
  • Mike Tomaro
  • National Jazz Workshop
  • The Capital Bones
  • The importance and value of sight-reading skills
  • Charles Colin "Rhythms Complete" book
  • What's the payoff for a piece of music
  • Bill Watrous running sound for The Capital Bones in Rochester
  • New Capital Bones album coming soon
  • Matt's kids are both freaky good musicians
  • The importance of speaking the language of jazz
  • Terry Bingham and a sweaty bald head

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

May 14, 2019

Tim Buzbee has been the Principal Tubist with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra since 2010. Tim grew up in Queen City, Texas and knows he would probably be flipping burgers if not for the help of teachers Ed Jones, Gene Pokorny, and Matt Good. He has performed as guest tubist with many orchestras including the Chicago Symphony, Danish Radio Orchestra, Swedish Radio Orchestra, Dallas Wind Symphony, Malaysia Philharmonic, and the Helsingborg Symphony.

As a soloist, he has performed with the Iceland Symphony, Singapore Symphony, Acapulco Symphony, Marshall Symphony and the “Pershing Own” Army Band in Washington D.C and currently has two solo CDs on the Albany Record label. Before taking his position at the MSO he held the Principal Tuba position at the Iceland Symphony, Chicago Civic Orchestra, Acapulco Philharmonic, Singapore Symphony, Gavle Symphony, and the Malmo Symphony.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • Has won gigs in 8 different countries
  • Calling us from Australia in the middle of the night
  • Originally from Queen City TX (pop. 1,600)
  • Started on country fiddle, taking after his grandfather, later moved on to the bass guitar
  • Switched to euphonium and later was drawn to the tuba
  • Didn't take it seriously until mid-way through his undergrad
  • Being put in a piece of metal
  • Was going to work on a fishing boat in Alaska
  • Pantless Mahler 6 leading to a breaking and entering incident (and the launch of his career path)
  • Studying with Ed Jones
  • Learning the Three Furies 3rd movement in one night
  • The influence of Gene Pokorny
  • Making the simple beautiful
  • Having to play catch up 
  • Studying with Matt Good and Dave Kirk
  • Winning a few gigs before moving on to study with Gene Pokorny
  • Ed provided the foundation of fundamentals, Matt helped him understand what to do with the sound and Gene helped him build a musical product he could sell
  • Leaving a busy career in Chicago to go to Singapore
  • Following his own path
  • Singapore was too crowded for him so he moved on to Sweden
  • The differences in playing in those orchestras
  • Adding Iceland Symphony to the mix for a year
  • Tim's wife, Jessica (who he met while she was Principal Trombone in the same Swedish orchestra) also won a gig in Iceland and they eventually moved there
  • Having five kids
  • Flying with a tuba (hilarity and bent metal)
  • Audition strategy, switching from being physically prepared to be mentally prepared
  • Tim's forthcoming (hypothetical) book"The Death of American Brass Playing Due to the 3 T's (Tone, Time, Tuning)"
  • How do I make an emotional connection with a listener?
  • The 3 T's are too procedural and disconnect the player from the listener
  • Running mental audition processes ahead of auditions, changing the variables each time, always simulation culminating with him being announced as a winner
  • Every audition system is flawed in some way so you have to find a process to allow you to succeed in any situation
  • The influence of the book, "Unleash the Warrior Within" by Richard Machowicz
  • Mental toughness

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Apr 30, 2019

In this Listener's Choice episode, Andrew & Lance follow up with more information on starting a brass group.

In this episode we pick up where we left off in TBJ97, covering many areas, including:

  • Killer squirrels
  • Rehearsal techniques
  • How will you present the art?
  • Being producers of music vs. consumers of music
  • Lindberg (not that one)
  • Collaborations with other artists like the T'Ang Quartet, Imani Winds, Enso Quartet, etc.
  • How do you find gigs?
  • Working with management
  • How to spend $20,000
  • Do the legwork

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Apr 16, 2019

Richard A. White is the subject of the upcoming documentary, "R.A.W. Tuba" and is one of our most inspirational guests. He spoke with us about his life, his career, and the upcoming film.

From his website:

With over two decades of performing on the world’s classical music stages, tubist Richard White has matured into a musician known for his clear sound and stylistic flexibility. He began his tuba studies with Ed. Goldstein at age twelve at The Baltimore School for the Performing Arts, where he graduated with honors. He then went to the Peabody Conservatory of Music to study with David Fedderly (Principal Tubist, Baltimore Symphony) where he received his Bachelor’s degree. On the advice of Mr. Fedderly, Richard traveled to Indiana University to study with the legendary Professor Daniel Perantoni. He continued his studies there receiving both his Master’s and Doctoral degrees. Richard Antoine White, also known as RawTuba, is the first African American, to receive a DM in Tuba!

Dr. White held the position of Principal Tubist with the New Mexico Symphony Orchestra from 2004 until it’s untimely demise in 2011 and is currently in his seventh season as Principal Tubist of the New Mexico Philharmonic. Dr. White is also principal tubist with The Santa Fe Symphony and Chorus. Richard enjoys playing in the Duo, Diversity Matters, with pianist Pamela Viktoria Pyle, in addition to teaching at the University of New Mexico, where he is Associate Professor of tuba/euphonium, and Associate Director of the Spirit Marching Band. Dr. White has performed with the Canadian Brass Quintet, Indiana University Faculty Brass Quintet, New Mexico Symphony Brass Quintet, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Colorado Symphony Orchestra, Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, Malaysian Philharmonic, Santa Fe Opera, Sphinx Symphony, Spoleto Music Festival U.S.A., Music in the Mountains, a summer festival located in beautiful Durango, CO, and many others. Dr. White is an Adams Artist and performs exclusively on these instruments.

Prior to moving to New Mexico, Dr. White was one of the top freelance musicians in the Indianapolis area, where he recorded with such greats as movie film composer John Williams, Cincinnati Pops conductor Eric Kunzel, and the late great wind ensemble conductor Frederik Fennell. Throughout his musical and educational career development, Dr. White has had a passionate interest in motivational speaking. That dream has recently materialized itself with the launching of his website rawtuba.com. Sharing inspirational thoughts and philosophies that have motivated Dr. White has taken him to Mexico, South America, Europe, South East Asia and across the United States of America – with more engagements on the horizon.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • How the "R.A.W. Tuba" film came about
  • Bringing love to Baltimore
  • The filming process
  • Mr. P and his stool
  • Having a literary agent
  • Richard's story
  • The water fountain
  • The emotional toll it has taken on him
  • Sam Pilafian's influence
  • Building himself a gig at UNM by teaching football players respiratory function
  • A kid named King playing a young Richard in the film
  • Breaking into the filmmaker's car (with permission)
  • Screenings always open with some sort of act
  • Short intro followed by the film, a performance, a Q&A and performance of "We Are the World"
  • Ed Goldstein and Dave Fedderly
  • Meeting his natural father in Baltimore at a screening
  • R.A.W. Tuba t-shirts
  • Working with J.D. Shaw at UNM
  • Playing in Brass Theater
  • Breathing Gym
  • His gig at UNM
  • The importance of the hang
  • Three rules for his studio: have fun, sound good, make music
  • Motivational speaking
  • Hustle and Flow
  • Diversifying his professional portfolio
  • Losing 64 lbs. and reclaiming his health
  • Doing the right thing and behaving with integrity
  • Loyalty
  • Posting the rejection letters on his walls and ceiling

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Apr 2, 2019

TBJ108: Jim "Don't call me BB" Nova on writing, driving and April Fooling. 

Pittsburgh Symphony trombonist Jim Nova puts up with more abuse from Andrew & Lance for no good reason. 

From his website:

My love for all musical things Star Wars began a long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away… As a six-year-old child, my father took my brother and me to see The Empire Strikes Back. Even at that age, I was overwhelmed with how important the music was to the storytelling, and thus began my lifelong love of the incredible scores of John Williams.

A few years later, at age nine, I began playing the trombone in my home state of Connecticut. As a child, I received my early musical exposure and training from my father, Anesti Nova. During high school, I studied with my first private trombone teacher, Assistant Principal/Second Trombonist of the Hartford Symphony, George Sanders.

After graduating high school I attended the prestigious Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia where I received my bachelor’s degree studying with Glenn Dodson, who was Philadelphia Orchestra’s Principal Trombonist at the time. This is where the seed of this album A Fall from Light to Dark first began to grow. When I was a student at Curtis, Mr. Dodson would hold epic trombone get-togethers called, “Bone Bashes” where the Curtis trombone students and the Philadelphia Orchestra trombone section would play through incredible arrangements and transcriptions of all kinds of pieces. This where I first started to create my own trombone ensemble arrangements and transcriptions. Mr. Dodson’s Han Solo-like swagger was contagious as we would tackle these pieces.

I then moved to Boston to pursue a Master’s Degree on a full scholarship at the New England Conservatory of Music, studying with Norman Bolter who was Second Trombonist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Principal Trombone of the Boston Pops Orchestra at the time. It was during this time that Mr. Bolter fostered my “Start with what you can do” attitude that I still use today, in both my own artistic development as well as with my students. He truly was and still is, my master Yoda in so many ways.

After finishing my master’s degree, I freelanced in Boston for several years, substituting on a regular basis with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Boston Pops Orchestra, making several recordings and television broadcasts with both groups as both principal and second trombone. It was here in Boston that my musical path first crossed with John Williams! I had the opportunity to perform with him on countless Boston Pops concerts and even performed on the world concert premiere of the concert suite from Star Wars Episode 1: The Phantom Menace.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • The Bubble Butt Strikes Back
  • The joke is on...?
  • Parker soprano trombone mouthpiece
  • Juilliard gig with Joe Alessi
  • 40th "Trombone at the Movies" gig, featuring film music trombone choir arrangements at colleges and universities
  • Soundcloud page has passed 750,000 listens
  • ITF closing concert in summer of 2019 with full concert versions of the same music
  • A "Who's Who" of amazing players on the ITF
  • Christopher Bill crashing in his basement and an upcoming collaboration debuting May the Fourth
  • Context is everything
  • His evolving relationship with Joe Alessi
  • Boston Brass Fanfare Project
  • Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University, with a real-live Pappert Person
  • Cathy Heller's podcast, "Don't Keep Your Day Job"
  • Jim's cat is a coffee model
  • Jim's lead foot
  • Less horsepower than a horse
  • Play in a big orchestra, drive a fast car
  • He took off like a stabbed rat
  • Paying for a ticket with a ticket
  • Exhibition of speed
  • Driving at race tracks and in driving schools
  • Becoming a performance driving teacher
  • Taking possession of his BMW while on tour with the PSO
  • The Green Death
  • Parallels between learning driving and learning trombone
  • Jimmy James

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Mar 19, 2019
Christopher is a trombonist, singer, and multi-instrumentalist based outside of NYC, but it’s more accurate to say he’s based on the internet. He has been playing piano since he was 6 years old, trombone since he was 10, and he has been composing/arranging since he was 12.
 
Christopher has a Bachelor of Music for classical trombone performance from the SUNY Purchase Conservatory of Music in New York. While at the conservatory he studied with critically acclaimed trombonists Weston Sprott (Metropolitan Opera), Denson Paul-Pollard (Metropolitan Opera), John Fedchock (Grammy Nominated Jazz Trombonist), and the absolutely incomparable Timothy Albright.
Christopher is best known for his all-trombone arrangements of popular songs. His YouTube Channel has been gaining popularity since the spring of 2014 when a cover of Pharrell Williams’ “Happy” where Christopher uses a looping station to compose the song on the spot went viral. His videos have amassed over 30 million views and a following of over 175,000 subscribers. In April of 2014, Christopher independently released his first cover album, Breakthrough, which was followed by his Christmas album, Smiling’s My Favorite. More recently, Christopher released an original pop album called Half Man, Half Machine which mixes acoustic sounds with electronic instruments. He is the Youth Workshop Coordinator of the International Trombone Festival and a marketing consultant for the International Trombone Association.
 
Christopher enjoys a busy schedule of performances, clinics, and masterclasses. In addition to producing a new video every Saturday for his YouTube Channel, he often performs at festivals such as the American Trombone Workshop, Midwest Clinic, Texas Bandmasters Association, Con Brio Festivals, Conn-Selmer Institute, Western International Band Clinic, and the International Trombone Festival.
 
In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:
  • Household name status (in Andrew's house)
  • Recording in Andrew's basement
  • Starting out exactly eight years ago as a freshman in college
  • When it stopped being so cringy
  • How his arranging chops have changed over time
  • Using homework for fun and profit
  • Using the arrangements to further develop as a musician
  • The impact of shirt color in his arrangements
  • How far he plans in advance
  • Taking yourself seriously
  • The importance of consistent uploads
  • He hasn't missed a week in four years
  • The Jerry Seinfeld of Trombone
  • Leave Christopher's Grandmother out of this
  • Two kinds of people: those who think they're cool and those who know they're not
  • The "Take on Me" pic, (worth it)
  • Cease and Desist
  • Living off Patreon and YouTube ad revenue
  • Exploring new platforms
  • Focusing on select existing programs
  • Figuring out what content works for your audience on the various platforms
  • Sticking with it for three years before gaining traction
  • The impact of the "Happy" video on his career
  • What to do for the next project after a viral hit
  • How much is too much for an audience
  • How to do a cover without getting sued
  • Meeting some of the folks who did the originals of the covers he's made
  • Dennis Deyoung busting his hump
  • Andrew's embouchure looks like he's eating a ham sandwich

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Mar 5, 2019

Legendary trumpeter Jim Pandolfi has one of the most amazing stories in music. Or most places.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • How Andrew and Jim first met in NYC many moons ago
  • Applesauce
  • Life out on Cape Cod (in the Dagobah System)
  • "The older I get, the better I was"
  • 15 years playing with The Met (wearing telescoping glasses due to an eye condition, macular degeneration)
  • Having to leave before his vision loss got too bad
  • How determination became the byword of his career
  • The impact his attitude had on the other folks around him
  • Playing loud (like really loud) in Japan on Samson and Delilah
  • Overcoming the involuntary response with excellence
  • Be a musician who happens to play the trumpet
  • Practicing golf in his apartment (between the aquarium, the big-screen TV, the piano and his horns)
  • Mark Gould locking in musically and personally
  • Surviving in a symphony orchestra (the 3 most important rules)
  • Only needed 4 or five notes to make an assessment of someone's playing
  • The development of his teaching style and philosophy
  • Everybody wants to play loud but most play too heavy (bear down too much)
  • Listening to Bryn Terfel, connecting the power coming from the reserve (feel the reserve, don't push)
  • How they get the fork to their mouth in the morning
  • Pick up your chest
  • Have the sound come from behind your sternum
  • Take pause
  • Single tonguing
  • Set and forget tonguing
  • The difference between thinking and concentration
  • How well can you concentrate?
  • Puttin' on the Ritz (during Flying Dutchman)
  • More Gould stories (with Rich Kelley cameos)
  • Peter Weller playing Clifford Brown tunes on Pandolfi's horn while driving golf balls between opera acts
  • Mel Broiles influence on Jim
  • Fantastic Mel stories (both music- and aviation-related)
  • "Mel Broiles, Starring in His Own Movie"

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

 

Feb 19, 2019

Seth had performed frequently with the Baltimore Symphony prior to assuming a full-time position in 2014 and performed during the BSO’s west coast tour and its 2010, 2014, and 2016 Carnegie Hall appearances with Marin Alsop. He can be heard on the BSO’s two most recent albums featuring the symphonies of Leonard Bernstein conducted by Marin Alsop (Naxos), as well as Ms. Alsop's recording with the Colorado Symphony of Roy Harris Symphonies 3 and 4 (Naxos). Horner has performed with the Philadelphia Orchestra, National Symphony, Kennedy Center Opera, New Jersey Symphony, Louisville Symphony, Oregon Symphony, and New World Symphony among others. He has made chamber music appearances with the Washington Symphonic Brass, the Bay Street Brassworks, and the Clipper City Brass. Horner was a featured soloist with the Capital Wind Symphony in Vienna, VA, and was a finalist at the 2010 International Tuba and Euphonium Conference.

Seth Horner has served as an audition panel member and coach for Carnegie Hall’s National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America as well as Carnegie’s NYO2. In the summer, he has been on the faculty of Wyoming Seminary’s Performing Arts Institute in Kingston, PA as the instructor of tuba and euphonium as well as performing with the Oregon Bach Festival and Britt Festival orchestras. Mr. Horner has given masterclasses at the University of Oregon, Ithaca University, and Towson University. Seth resides in Durham, NC.

In this fun and lively episode, we cover:

  • Lance is grumpy (and whelmed)
  • Seth talking to himself
  • Life is good
  • Being a professional tuba player is the best gig in the world
  • Andrew's coffee issues
  • Saints and Rams controversy
  • The Durham NC minor league baseball team (the Bulls, from Bull Durham fame)
  • His fiance found his box of mouthpieces and questioned the whole relationship
  • Mike Parker's mouthpiece issues
  • Seth's grandfather was a tuba player, had a family band
  • Andrew's most recent Jacob's Podcast episode about an influential Rex Martin class and the influence of the mouthpiece selection
  • Tage Larsen of the Chicago Symphony
  • Chris Hall and Chris Hall
  • Don't pick a fight with a child or an animal
  • Playing in the Baltimore Symphony for three seasons after David Fedderly's retirement
  • Studying with Fedderly
  • Baltimore Brass Company (and how it compared to working with the BSO)
  • Dave Fedderly: Action-packed with wisdom
  • The most important teacher of music is life
  • The importance of phrasing and sub-phrasing
  • Playing with the North Carolina Symphony
  • Playing for elementary school students all over North Carolina
  • How the state supports the organization
  • Bubble Butt
  • Turning down a military band position
  • Trusting your gut
  • Meeting Andrew at the Greensboro tuba conference (Lance was there too)
  • The Captain's Log

LINKS:

https://www.sethhorner.com/

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
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  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Feb 5, 2019

TBJ103: Joe Lovinsky, horn phenom, discusses his time in the Army band, being a sharp-shooter, cage fighter, and ultra runner. Yes really. 100-Mile Joe!

Joe Lovinsky is an amazing player, teacher, and person. He sits down with Andrew & Lance to discuss why he may, in fact, be the most interesting man in the world!

From his bio page:

Joseph Lovinsky, principal horn and frequent soloist of the Maryland Symphony Orchestra, was appointed to this position by world-renowned horn soloist Barry Tuckwell.  Lovinsky, the former principal horn of The United States Army Band “Pershing’s Own” as well as The Army Orchestra, and The Army Brass Quintet in Washington DC, was also a frequent soloist with those ensembles. From 2013-2018, Joe taught at the Shenandoah Conservatory at Shenandoah University in Winchester, Virginia, where he was a member of both the Faculty Brass and Wind Quintets.  Joseph was horn instructor of the 2014 Music for All Summer Symposium at Ball State University and the 2016 Chamber Music National Festival in Indianapolis, Indiana. Joseph Lovinsky is a "Yamaha Performing Artist." 

"You'll never know how far you can go unless you try to go too far" 

Joseph Lovinsky, Play Without Limits 

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • Joe's nervousness
  • Playing Principal horn in Pershing's Own Army Band for over 20 years
  • The various amazing players who played in the Army Band Brass Quintet over the years
  • The Amazing Harry Watters
  • Joe's joke
  • iPad music reader fail
  • Empire Brass story, signals crossed
  • JD Shaw joining the quintet in a very special piece of performance art
  • Battle of the Bands
  • Playing in a variety of smaller orchestras in Florida while in "retirement"
  • Joanna Hersey texting Joe (to warn him?)
  • Difference between playing in orchestras vs. quintets
  • Work on endurance and technical ability for quintet playing
  • Being homeless while a student at Juilliard due to a student loan glitch (and fantastic Peter Mennin story), sleeping in a practice room
  • Studying with James Chambers
  • Joe's sister is a Federal Prosecutor
  • Leaving Curtis to go to Juilliard
  • Growing up in inner-city Miami (Liberty City)
  • Being a security guard at Trump Plaza and Trump Tower
  • Celebrity sightings
  • Johnny Carson
  • Woody English
  • No downside to being a nice person
  • The influence of Joe's Dad, especially his character
  • Joe's other fascinating (and wildly successful) siblings
  • Cage fighting for fun and profit
  • John Delancey (head of Curtis) calling him into his office and changing his life
  • Becoming an ultra-runner

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Jan 22, 2019

Classical Trumpeter and Gold Medal Global Music Award Winner Mary Elizabeth Bowden has been described by Gramophone Magazine as “brilliant” and “radiant in new repertoire for trumpet.” Bowden, a Yamaha Performing Artist, is highly regarded for her artistry and virtuosity as a soloist and has been praised for the clarity, purity, and power of her sound. Bowden released her debut album, “Radiance”, on Summit Records featuring new American works. She has been featured on MPR’s “New Classical Tracks” with Julie Amacher, which is being aired on NPR stations nationwide.

Bowden’s 2018-19 performance highlights include solo performances at the Maspalomas International Trumpet Festival in Gran Canaria and at Lieksa Brass Week in Finland. She will also perform as a soloist with the Kassia Ensemble, Chrysalis Chamber Players, Richmond Philharmonic, and will make her Vancouver and New York City recital debuts. She will release her second solo album through Summit Records with the Kassia Ensemble.

Bowden is the First Prize winner of the International Women’s Brass Conference Trumpet Competition. She has performed as a soloist with Montana’s Big Sky Festival, Evansville Philharmonic, Peninsula Symphony (California), Laredo Philharmonic Orchestra, Croatian Army Wind Band at the Velika Gorica Brass Festival, Festival Amadeus Strings (Montana), Springfield Symphony (Missouri), Naples Symphony, Fifth Avenue Chamber Orchestra (Florida), Richmond Philharmonic Orchestra, San Juan Symphony, Springfield (Ohio) Symphony Orchestra and New Haven Chamber Orchestra, among several others. She has performed with trumpet soloist Jouko Harjanne at the Lieksa Brass Week in Finland, where she also served on the jury of the Lieksa International Trumpet Competition. At The Banff Center in Alberta, Canada, she performed Vivaldi’s Concerto for 2 Trumpets with trumpeters Jens Lindemann and Ryan Anthony. She was also awarded the Public Prize from the Perrenoud Foundation International Music Competition. Bowden frequently performs in recital both in solo programs and as the Dash Duo with her husband, trumpeter David Dash. Bowden and Dash teach at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, Dash as the Assistant Professor of Trumpet and Bowden as a Resident Artist.

Bowden is a founding member of both Seraph Brass and the Chrysalis Chamber Players, a recipient of a Yale Alumni Grant. Seraph will be a guest ensemble at the 2019 International Trumpet Guild Conference in Miami and was the featured ensemble at the International Women’s Brass Conference in 2017 and at the Lieksa Brass Week in Finland in 2017 and 18. They released their debut album, “Asteria,” through Summit Records in 2018, which has been awarded a Silver Medal Global Music Award. Bowden has collaborated in chamber music programs at the Marlboro Music Festival, Lakes Area Music Festival, The Banff Centre, and at the Sydney Opera House under the baton of Håkan Hardenberger. She has served on the adjunct faculty of Virginia Commonwealth University and at The Curtis Institute of Music’s Young Artist Summer Program.

An experienced orchestral musician, Bowden is currently Principal Trumpet of the Artosphere Festival Orchestra and a member of the Iris Orchestra. She has served as Principal Trumpet of the Sarasota Opera Orchestra, Lakes Area Music Festival Orchestra, New Zealand’s Auckland Philharmonia, the Daejeon Philharmonic in Korea, and with Seraphic Fire’s Firebird Chamber Orchestra. At the Lucerne Festival in Switzerland, she held the principal chair in Pierre Boulez’s performance of Mahler’s Symphony No. 6, which was released on CD in 2011. The Luzerner Zeitung described her playing in one word – “outstanding.” Bowden is also a member of the Richmond Symphony Orchestra. She has also performed many dates on Adele’s 2016 North American tour.

Bowden began full-time college studies at the age of 14, receiving an Associate degree from the Joliet Junior College. Subsequently, she earned her Bachelor of Music degree from The Curtis Institute of Music, where she studied with the principal trumpeter of the Philadelphia Orchestra, David Bilger. She was awarded her Master of Music degree in 2006 from the Yale School of Music where she studied on a full scholarship with trumpeter Allan Dean.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • Hanging in Naples Florida
  • Her new teaching gig at Shenandoah Conservatory
  • The application process for Shenandoah
  • The importance of networking
  • Lieksa Brass Week
  • Five Year Goals
  • Consortium project for Seraph Brass and Wind Ensemble
  • Recording in Lieksa
  • Crowdfunding the recording project via Indiegogo, raising over $26K(!!!)
  • Adding a trumpet player to Seraph Brass
  • How to plan for the Seraph seasons and projects
  • Memorization
  • Upcoming solo album, "Reverie," pre-order available on her site
  • Recording with the Pittsburgh-based Kassia Ensemble
  • Working with Rick DeJonge (frequently tortured pal of Andrew & Lance) on the arrangements for the album
  • Choosing to release on Summit Records
  • The current breakdown of her schedule
  • Touring and performing with her husband as the Dash Duo
  • Consortium for a new trumpet concerto
  • Working with a composer on a new work
  • "Challenge Accepted"
  • The importance of risk-taking
  • How and when to say no to gigs and opportunities
  • Better to say no upfront than to back out later

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Jan 8, 2019

Joe Jackson was born in Dallas, Texas into a musical family; his mother is a former professional clarinetist, and his father, Jim Jackson, a former trombonist with the Fort Worth Symphony, is today a renown recording engineer.

Joe chose the trombone at age 12, and during his high school years was the recipient of three Down Beat Magazine “DeeBee” awards. During his tenure at the University of North Texas, Joe studied with Vern Kagarice, Hal Galper, David Liebman, and Don “Jake” Jacoby, played lead & jazz trombone in the famed One O’Clock Lab Band, and was named the National Association of Jazz Educators 1985 College Musician of the Year.

Joe left UNT in 1990 to join the Maynard Ferguson Band. He spent a year with Ferguson, performing throughout the United States and in Europe. From 1991 to 2011 he was lead trombonist with the U.S. Air Force Airmen of Note, and from 2004 to 2011 was the Director of the Airmen of Note. During his tenure as Director, Joe produced the award-winning Jazz Heritage Series heard on 112 radio and media stations worldwide, and eight recordings including “Cool Yule” which climbed to #2 on the JazzWeek chart in December 2010.

As a freelance trombonist and arranger, Joe performs with top East Coast bands including the Woody Herman Orchestra, the David Liebman Big Band & Chaise Lounge.  Additionally, he performs regularly in DC-area theatre productions and is in high demand as a session player. He has contributed hundreds of commissioned arrangements to dozens of ensembles across the country, and his educational arrangements are published by Alfred Music.  Joe has appeared as a clinician & soloist at music festivals across the country.

Joe publishes his website dedicated to serving the trombone community, www.jazztbone.com.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • Euphonium buyback program
  • Tubas with kickstands
  • Swiss Army Knife Gig Machine Person (SAKGMP)
  • Joe's parents
  • Recording with his Dad and the Airmen of Note
  • Getting recycled in basic training
  • "The Terrible Airman" march
  • Basic training philosophy
  • The value in extending his stay in San Antonio
  • The day the drill instructors found out you would outrank them
  • OICU812
  • Sorry A**-ed Individual
  • Downbeat Magazine DB awards
  • The impact and influence of Joe's band directors
  • The Airmen of Note
  • Selling candy
  • "Choir, stand up."
  • Playing with Maynard Ferguson Band
  • A Tale of Two Airmen
  • Becoming the director of the Airmen of Note 2004-2011
  • Programming themed CDs
  • Recording live CDs, especially "Airmen of Note, Live"
  • Glenn Miller
  • "Cool Yule"
  • Growing where you're planted
  • Advantages/disadvantages of having an officer in charge
  • "Earl Williams Trombones, Out of Business Since 1973"
  • Where Joe is playing these days
  • Percentage of classical vs. jazz playing in Joe's current life
  • "Like Wes, but with affirming parents"
  • Joe's transcription work

LINKS:

Joe's site

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Dec 25, 2018

TBJ101: Intern Listener's Choice. Our first batch of interns for this year fire off some amazing questions for us to tackle. 

We have always relied on interns to help us carry the ball forward in Pedal Note Media and have ramped up our efforts this year. We are incredibly fortunate to have such talented and intelligent folks helping us out and one of the ways we're trying to return the favor for them is to help them with their own careers and projects. This first batch is about to end their time with us and we thought it'd be a great time to let you hear their voices and thank them publically. They asked great questions. They did great work. They are great folks. Thank you, interns!

Andrew & Lance

DRAKE DOMININGUE

Hey guys!

My name is Drake Domingue and I’m a tuba player currently based out of Las Cruces, NM where I work freelancing and building custom french horns for Patterson Hornworks.

I’ve heard a lot of differing opinions on doubling and am interested in what you all have to say on the matter.

I’ve learned quickly over my short career as a tuba player that the best way to make a living playing tuba is by playing bass guitar and trombone

I do a lot of sub work with orchestras in the area, but most of the playing I do is Latin/Funk/Pop in nature. Not to mention, making people dance can be way more satisfying than watching a stuffy crowd be confused about when to clap.

I can begin to understand the logic behind not wanting to half-ass anything, especially playing an instrument, but the people I play with don’t seem to mind at all that I’m not an artist level bass or trombone player, and I sure don’t mind bringing in a few extra hundred bucks a month.

What are your thoughts? Should low brass players (especially tuba and euphonium players) learn a secondary instrument? Should it be a requirement?

CODY MESSERSMITH

Hi, Andrew and Lance! I’m Cody Messersmith, Intermediate Music Specialist in the Dallastown Area School District in York, Pennsylvania. I freelance as a tubist and have done work on the side for instrument repair companies as well as Parker Mouthpieces. My short-term goals include going back to school to pursue a degree or degrees in tuba performance. I feel that I’ve worn a lot of hats in my short career and the one that seems to bring me the most joy is when the horn is on my face, either playing or teaching. I’d also love to speak to groups of students about the opportunities that they have in school and immediately after college. Being a young person in this field can be and at times is intimidating and I want to help lessen that intimidation for my peers. I’ve written a presentation that talks about just that, it’s geared towards college students and young professionals. I’d love to present it, but I’m not sure how to go about it. Overall I feel like I’m constantly building but I don’t know where my destination is or should be. How do I find it? I just want to play tuba and as Lance would say “live indoors and eat food.”

ARMANDO ALICANDU

Hey, Junkies, my name is Armando Alicandu and I live in South Florida where I play the trombone and euphonium. As I finish my final year at Palm Beach Atlantic University I look towards the future and wonder what I'll do with all this extra time on my hands.

During gigging season I find myself playing with a brass quintet for one rehearsal and the gig and then we disperse- like... "See ya next year!". I would like to form a chamber group that consistently rehearses and performs for community outreach events, also taking gigs to make some cash.

some of the challenges I've faced with establishing and maintaining a chamber group in general are

1 finding the right people to work with as far as being available for consistent scheduling and being motivated to edify the group In general.

2 finding venues to perform, both for free and for profit.

I have a brass quintet in mind because of the available rep. but maybe there are other combinations that would be easier to coordinate.

How would you recommended I tackle these 2 issues in the process of forming a chamber group.

DOMINICK VIVIANO

Hey everyone! My name is Dominick Viviano and I am a second-year masters student at the University of Central Arkansas where I study trombone performance. I serve as a studio graduate assistant which allows me to teach undergraduate applied lessons for non-majors as well as assist with our two trombone choirs.

My primary career goal is to be a college trombone professor. My question for the Brass Junkies is this, could you outline the process from writing and updating your CV through the interview and audition process for securing a college teaching job. I know that there are unique elements for every position, but a general overview of your experiences would be great. Details about the actual day, from showing up to what you ate to how you dressed would be helpful as well.

Also, what advice would you give this next generation of applied professors coming into the field?

SIMON LENOE

What is the best advice anyone has ever given you in regards to teaching effectively? 

ABBY LANNAN

Hello everyone, my name is Abby Lannan and I am a euphonium player who is currently studying to get her masters degree in euphonium performance at Carnegie Mellon with Lance LaDuke. I also run the Instagram and youtube page for GoofyEuph. My short-term goal includes getting a second masters degree in Arts Management and my question has something related to that.

How hard is it to find a playing or performing outlet for someone whose goal isn’t to end up with a top playing position? I personally have no interest in pursuing military band positions or similar jobs where my day to day job is only performing on my instrument. However, I want to keep playing and keep getting better. What are some suggestions that you guys might have for a musician like me?

LINKS:

Mockingbird Foundation for Music Education

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.










Dec 11, 2018

The legendary Sam Pilafian on Empire Brass, Leonard Bernstein, and life-threatening pedagogy. We talk about his life as a tubist, arranger, composer, educator, performer, producer, and mentor (and countless other descriptors) on our 100th episode.

Sam Pilafian is perhaps best known as a founding member of the internationally renowned Empire Brass Quintet (1971-1993). He has also recorded and performed with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, the Orchestra of St. Luke’s, the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Duke Ellington Orchestra, Lionel Hampton, and Pink Floyd among others.

His long career has earned him an Emmy for Excellence in Instructional Video Production, the Walt Disney Award for Imagination and Innovation in Design, the Walter Naumberg Chamber Music Award, the Harvard Music Association Prize, the University of Miami’s Distinguished Alumni Award, the Brevard Music Center Distinguished Alumni Award, the Robert Trotter Visiting Professorship at the University of Oregon and the annual Outstanding Teacher Award from Arizona State University.

Sam is the co-author, with Patrick Sheridan, of the best selling pedagogy texts and DVD’s “Breathing Gym” and “Brass Gym”. Professor Pilafian previously served for 44 years on the faculties of Boston University, the Tanglewood Institute, Berklee College of Music, Frost School of Music at the University of Miami and is Professor Emeritus at Arizona State University. 

In this fun and lively (and tearful) discussion, we cover:

  • The meaning of J
  • Andrew as a student of Sam "Up an octave" story
  • Life-threatening pedagogy
  • The amazing story of Sam's recent battle with cancer
  • Beating 3+ Million to 1 odds
  • How studios turn into family
  • Meeting Lance part 1, Midwest Band and Orchestra Clinic
  • Meeting Lance part 2, Army Band Conference
  • Brass Band of Battle Creek
  • Scott Hartman fruit salad
  • Meeting Andrew, Andrew was 12 at Tanglewood
  • Meeting Andrew, Andrew was 14 at BUTI
  • The amazing array of young players Sam heard, coached and taught at Tanglewood
  • Hearing Michael Sachs as a young player
  • Leonard Bernstein and the beginnings of Empire Brass
  • Oak trees
  • Gunther Schuller, Michael Tilson Thomas, and Bernstein inspiring the beginnings of Empire Brass
  • Gunther Schuller and Eugene Goossens playing name that tune
  • Parallels with the Emerson String Quartet and how that inspired Empire Brass
  • Finding the nucleus in the music
  • Playing bass lines
  • Working onstage with Alvin Ailey Dance Company at the opening of the Kennedy Center (in brown pajamas)
  • Being Bernstein's daughter's bodyguard at the Kennedy Center reception
  • How Empire Brass become a full-time gig
  • Rolf Smedvig's playing
  • A major Empire Brass blowup at Tanglewood witnessed by Andrew in 1993
  • How Andrew got the gig with Dallas Brass while in a lesson with Sam
  • The line between obnoxious and oblivious
  • Scrapshoot
  • Winning the 1976 Naumburg Chamber Music Prize, the first brass group to do so, leading to being picked up by Columbia Artists
  • The Empire Brass recordings
  • Bernstein "Always go towards growth"
  • Seeing America on tour
  • Learning to talk on stage
  • His teacher, Connie Weldon
  • Coming up in Miami
  • Frederick Fennell encouraging Sam to diversify his career

LINKS:

Sam's site

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Nov 27, 2018

Tom Holtz is a former member of “The President’s Own” United States Marine Band in Washington, DC. During his career with the Marine Band, Tom served as a soloist, an arranger, and as a concert moderator. He also performed with the United States Coast Guard Band in New London, CT, and was featured as a soloist twice with the Army Blues, from Ft. Myer, VA. He retired from active duty in 2012, after more than 21 years of service. Tom currently works for the Department of Veterans Affairs as the office manager of the Dundalk Vet Center, part of the VA Maryland Health Care System.

Tom is an active freelance musician in both classical and jazz venues across the mid-Atlantic region. He currently plays in the Bayfield Brass Quintet, from Annapolis, MD; and the Beltway Brass Quintet, from Fredericksburg, VA.  Tom is also a regular member of two New Orleans-style jazz bands, Big Bertha’s Rhythm Kings, from Baltimore, MD; and the Creole Gumbo Jazz Band, from Chesapeake Beach, MD. He also plays in the Balkan gypsy band Balti Mare, from Baltimore, MD; Off Bass Brass, a tuba quartet based in Washington, DC.; and Heimat Echo, a traditional German polka band from Occoquan, VA.

Tom is a frequent recording artist, having made several CD’s with the Bayfield Brass Quintet, the Beltway Brass Quintet, and Off Bass Brass. His arrangements have been performed by numerous brass quintets, the United States Marine Band, the Chesapeake Orchestra, and the University of Maryland Marching Band. He is an active clinician and adjudicator nationwide.

A native of Geneseo, Illinois, Tom Holtz received his Bachelor of Music degree in 1991 from Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona. He now lives in Maryland with his wife, Becky, and his sons Alex, Doug and J.J.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • Marine Band
  • Jazz tuba
  • Less is more in jazz
  • Picking a strategy for standing out in his improv
  • Getting thrown to the wolves on a gig in high school
  • Knowing your scales
  • Learning by listening and doing
  • Jamie Abersold tracks
  • Picking notes in a moment that are a line and that lead you to a spot and indicate your direction to the rest of the band
  • Comparing improv learning to juggling
  • Using your existing strengths as an entry point
  • Homework for bass lines is scales then easy tunes with easy bass lines
  • The importance of writing out the changes and figuring out the form and structure of a tune
  • Playing along with a recording of the tune
  • Aim for clear and obvious, rather than fancy or showy
  • Keep time, the importance of keeping time
  • The differences (and similarities) between playing bass lines and solos
  • Travelin' Light
  • On solos, start with the melody and mess around with it
  • Becoming your own player
  • The major influence of Dan Perantoni (and Dan's piano chops)
  • Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Kirk Joseph
  • Rich Matteson and The Dukes of Dixieland
  • How playing in The President's Own Marine Band helped him play bass lines
  • Record yourself and look at the waveform
  • Fat Slice
  • Tonal Energy Tuner
  • What is happening in his head while he's playing
  • Settle down and do the job
  • Tension is the enemy of tone (Joe Alessi)
  • Focus on the front end of the notes
  • David Fedderly
  • Using a bass amp with his helicon
  • Horn and gear from car to gig in one trip
  • Phil Jones bass amp
  • Finding his helicon thanks to Steve Dillon
  • Adding a cup holder and a wireless mic to his horn

Links

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Nov 13, 2018

Trumpet soloist Buddy Deshler is an ambassador for the transformative powers of the arts, champion of living composers, and agent for change in the instrumental music field. His burgeoning career has taken him around the country, as well as internationally, and has allowed him to share the stage with ensembles such as the King’s Brass, The Rodney Marsalis Philadelphia Big Brass, Foden's Band of Sandbach, Cheshire, his own Vice City Brass, and Marquee Brass, and as of 2017, the illustrious Dallas Brass.

In addition, Buddy has performed with the Harrisburg Symphony Orchestra, Richmond Symphony Orchestra, Williamsburg Symphony Orchestra, York Symphony, Delaware Symphony, Washington Chamber Orchestra, Concert Artists of Baltimore, American Festival Pops Orchestra, and more. He has also been in residency at the Sewanee Summer Music Festival, Rafael Mendez Brass Institute, Le Domaine Forget in Quebec and the Banff Centre in Alberta, Canada.

Buddy presently resides in Midlothian, VA as an active freelance musician and educator. He holds a B.M. in Instrumental Performance and an Artist Diploma from the Frost School of Music, University of Miami and an M.M. Peabody Institute, Johns Hopkins University. His primary teachers have included Dennis Edelbrock, Phil Snedecor, Craig Morris, and Josef Burgstaller.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • How his life has forever been changed for the better due to his time with Andrew & Lance as an intern
  • Fred Brass
  • Tidewater Brass
  • Entrepreneurial Student lectures
  • Taking initiative
  • The influence of Buddy's Mom
  • TES Event Planner
  • Lance's theory of technological competence as it relates to age
  • Joining Dallas Brass
  • "Frustratingly Refined"
  • The importance of being organized
  • Balancing the various parts of his career
  • How he's planning for the future

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

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Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Oct 30, 2018

In this Listener's Choice episode, Andrew & Lance answer a frequently asked listener question regarding starting a brass group.

We cover many areas, including:

  • Start with why
  • Gigging group or full-time endeavor
  • Traditional brass quintet instrumentation?
  • Skills developed via chamber music 
  • The path if you want a gigging group
  • Opportunities to play different musical roles
  • The "who" decision
  • "Good to Great" by Jim Collins
  • Division of labor
  • The Polka Bandits
  • The Dead Animals
  • 2 Red Performance Commando Unit
  • Incorporate or not?
  • Picking a name
  • Branding
  • Picking the right market for your skills
  • Andrew's last Boston Brass gig

LINKS:

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Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Oct 16, 2018

Jennifer Marotta is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Trumpet at the University of Southern California Thornton School of Music. An active freelance musician based in Los Angeles, she regularly performs with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, San Francisco Symphony, San Diego Symphony, Los Angeles Opera, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Los Angeles Master Chorale, and the St. Louis Symphony.

Marotta is currently a member of the Grand Teton Music Festival and the Music of the Baroque in Chicago. She was a member of “The President’s Own” United States Marine Band from 2001 to 2005.

Originally from Naperville, Illinois, she earned her Bachelor of Music degree from Northwestern University and her Master of Music degree from DePaul University.

Marotta was a visiting trumpet professor at UCLA in 2016 and was Assistant Professor of Trumpet at Kennesaw State University from 2006 to 2012. She was also a visiting professor at Illinois State University in 2006 and was an artist-in-residence at Emory University from 2006 to 2010.

Jennifer, along with her husband Thomas Hooten, is the most recent editor for Arban’s Complete Conservatory Method for Trumpet, published by Carl Fischer. She serves on the board for the International Women’s Brass Conference and is the editor for their bi-annual newsletter.

In this fun and lively conversation, we cover:

  • Teaching at USC
  • Subbing for Jens at UCLA
  • Freelancing and travel
  • Playing in the US Marine Band
  • St. Louis and Atlanta on the way to LA
  • Being married to another professional trumpet player (Thomas Hooten, Principal trumpet in the LA Phil
  • Similar teaching styles with Tom
  • Differences in their playing styles
  • Ambassador of Euphonium, Adam Frey
  • Kennesaw State with Tom Gibson, Wes Funderburk, and Dave Kehler
  • Studying with Barbara Butler
  • Balancing fundamentals with musical communication
  • Treating each student in a way that is best for them
  • Taking the best stuff from her teachers and heroes
  • The USC students study with both of them and switch each semester
  • Teton Festival
  • Playing in "The President's Own" United States Marine Band
  • Joining the band just after 9/11
  • Seven-week tours and "Tour Babies"
  • Playing for President Reagan's funeral in 90-degree heat
  • Playing with the Atlanta Opera
  • Being on the board of the International Women's Brass Conference and editor of the newsletter
  • Playing with the Monarch Brass
  • Ask a Performer site

LINKS:

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  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Oct 2, 2018

TBJ95: TEM Takeover! In this crossover episode, we hear Andrew in conversation with Jeff Conner from The Entrepreneurial Musician podcast.

Jeff Conner has performed in over 30 countries on 4 continents with his brass quintet, Boston Brass. Jeff talks about how they went from a college group playing small gigs around the Boston area to an internationally touring, full-time ensemble.

Topics Covered:

  • How he got a powerful Boston businessman to financially support Boston Brass

  • The importance of having mentors that inspire you

  • Perseverance being a key to success

  • Not being afraid of the word no

  • Networking being a longterm process

  • Why developing your own brand is essential

  • The book he wrote with John Laverty, The Porfolio Musician, in which they detail the careers of over 40 different musicians

Links:

Books:

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  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Original episode produced by Austin Boyer and Buddy Deshler of FredBrass. This version lovingly produced by Will Houchin. 

Sep 18, 2018

Dr. Gail Robertson serves as Assistant Professor of Tuba and Euphonium/Jazz at the University of Central Arkansas where she is tubist in the Pinnacle Brass and teaches the Jazz Ensemble II. She earned her B.A. degree from the University of Central Florida and an M.M. in Euphonium Performance from Indiana University while serving as graduate assistant to Harvey Phillips. She postponed her doctoral studies at the University of Maryland with Dr. Brian Bowman to perform with the “Tubafours” at Walt Disney World, Orlando where she served as musical supervisor/chief arranger and produced a highly acclaimed CD, “Tubas Under the Boardwalk.” She has recently completed her D.M.A. as a University Distinguished Fellow at Michigan State University studying with Phil Sinder, Ava Ordman, and Ricardo Lorenz. She has taught on the faculties of Eastern Michigan University, the University of Central Florida, Bethune-Cookman University, the University of Florida, and remains active as a teacher, adjudicator, composer, arranger, and free-lance artist, both nationally and internationally.

I this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • Moving!
  • Playing with the Brass Band of Battle Creek
  • Spider bites
  • Her crazy summer
  • Blossom Festival Band with Loras Schissel and Travis Scott
  • Getting her DMA in 18 months at Michigan State University
  • The Tubafours
  • Teaching at Eastern Michigan University
  • Joining the faculty at the University of Central Arkansas
  • Starting on sax
  • Playing with Willie Clark and Mark Thiele
  • The beginnings of her arranging career
  • Hanging with Mr. Miyagi (or not)
  • Her current gig at UCA
  • Lessons learned from Harvey Phillips
  • Being a bari sax rock star
  • New Sousa Band
  • River City Brass Band
  • Symbiosis Duo with Stacy Baker
  • Playing with the Monarch Brass
  • Athena Brass Band
  • Owning a red pickup and pulling stuff with it
  • Fishing lure recommendations
  • Living with Tom Gillette for a year, shooting arrows and learning about Leonard Falcone
  • Serving as President-Elect for ITEA
  • Jerry Young
  • Lance's Fucik Uke article 
  • Her upcoming trip the US Virgin Islands
  • New pieces with euphonium and cajon
  • Her love for the glockenspiel

LINKS:

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  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
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  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

 

Sep 4, 2018

Euphonium and Tuba artist (and long-time buddy of Lance) Matt Tropman shares incredible stories of music, survival, and mayhem. Not necessarily in that order.

Matt Tropman currently serves as Assistant Professor of Tuba and Euphonium at the University of Arizona and is an active freelancer, soloist, and chamber musician. His performances have been praised in numerous publications such as the New York Times, which stated: “Tropman makes a serious case for the euphonium as a solo instrument.” An active clinician and recitalist on both the euphonium and tuba, Matt has performed and taught throughout the U.S. and Europe.

Matt’s two commercially released two CD’s; Continuum and From the Balcony (Summit Records), have been featured on programs such as NPR’s “All Things Considered”. He has performed with numerous bands, orchestras and chamber groups including the San Francisco Symphony and the Detroit Symphony. In his early career as a member of the U.S. Marine Band (President’s Own), he frequently performed as a soloist throughout the U.S. on the band’s National concert tours. 

Dr. Tropman received his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in euphonium performance from the University of Michigan and Arizona State University, respectively, and the Doctor of Musical Arts Degree in tuba performance from the University of Michigan.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • Improv comedy
  • Potato
  • The Tucson Improv Movement/The Soapbox
  • Manifesting a Memory
  • What Michael from "The Office," Matt and Lance all have in common
  • Matt's summer trips
  • New recording project
  • Notes From the Balcony
  • Recording rage stories
  • Matt's horrific bike crash, injury, and recovery
  • Helpful Body Modification (part of the dual album)
  • "Tropman Pinky"
  • The injury recovery process and physical therapy
  • Detroit Symphony as a motivator
  • Using music as a means of helping with his recovery
  • "What's the Deal With Classical Music"
  • Constant Tingle (Three-fer!)

LINKS:

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  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

 

Aug 21, 2018

TBJ92: Jason Ayoub, Principal Horn in The US Navy Band on Dallas Brass, playing with Charlie Vernon and meeting a moose

Chief Musician Jason Ayoub is the Principal Horn in the Navy Band and teaches at Towson University.

Chief Musician Jason Ayoub, a native of El Paso, Texas, joined the Navy Band in 2006. He received his Bachelor of Music from the University of North Texas (UNT), where he studied with William Scharnberg. During his final year at UNT, he joined the nationally acclaimed Dallas Brass. For four years he toured extensively with the ensemble throughout the United States and gave more than 300 performances and master classes. He has been a featured clinician and soloist at The Midwest Clinic as well as numerous Music Teachers National Association (MTNA) regional and national conferences.


Ayoub served as third horn with the Waco Symphony from 2001-2003 and third horn with the Delaware Symphony from 2003-2007 and has performed regularly with the Kennett and Baltimore Symphonies. He has also been a guest soloist with the Jackson, Scranton, Louisville and Utah Symphonies. He is featured as the solo horn on Ståle Kleiberg's "Requiem for the Victims of Nazi Persecution", recorded at Washington National Cathedral.

In this fun and lively episode, we cover:

  • How 19 years have passed since Andy, I mean Andrew was in Dallas Brass with Jason
  • Bladder control
  • Navy Band bus seating
  • Dallas Brass
  • Joining the Navy Band in 2006
  • The joys of basic training
  • Studied at North Texas
  • Traveling and playing gigs
  • "I learned a lot from you, even."
  • New Albany Tennessee
  • Best Dallas Brass gigs over the years
  • Hot springs in Alaska
  • Meeting a moose
  • Playing with Charlie Vernon
  • Navy Band audition process
  • Brass player name-dropping
  • American Band College
  • Dan Hostetler
  • Trying to learn drum kit
  • A typical day in the Navy Band
  • Touring with the Navy Band
  • Teaching at Towson State University
  • How he spends his crazy long commute
  • Playing with Tage Larsen
  • Jason's wife with the typical bassoon, ukulele, accordion doubling

LINKS:

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  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Aug 7, 2018

Canadian Tubist Jarrett McCourt is the Acting Principal Tuba of the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra and the Tubist of the Civic Orchestra of Chicago. Prior to this, Jarrett was the Tuba Fellow of the New World Symphony in Miami Beach, Florida. Jarrett’s playing has been called “magnificent” by the Palm Beach Daily News and “warm, romantic and seamless” by the South Florida Classical Review. Jarrett has performed with a number of different high-level ensembles, including the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, the Flint Symphony Orchestra, the Windsor Symphony Orchestra, and has also performed as Acting Principal Tuba with the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra and the National Arts Centre Orchestra. Additionally, Jarrett has performed under classical conductors such as Michael Tilson Thomas, Robert Spano, James Gaffigan, Susanna Mälkki and Leonard Slatkin, as well as alongside jazz heavyweights such as Esperanza Spalding, Wayne Bergeron, and Nicholas Payton.

In this fun and lively (and sometimes powerful and moving) conversation, we cover:

  • "Warm, romantic and seamless"
  • Chicago, playing with the Civic Orchestra
  • Moving from Miami and driving from Florida to Illinois
  • Playing with New World Symphony
  • Playing with Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra
  • Exit interview with NWS CEO, Howard Herring
  • The new concert hall for NWS, live projection of performances on the side of the building
  • The differences in culture between New World and Civic and Winnipeg
  • MTTs advice as a newbie in NWS
  • His suggestions to NWS addressing mental health initiatives
  • Mental health person on staff at U of Michigan School of Music
  • Pressures on professional musicians
  • Working for a suicide hotline for two years as an undergrad
  • Basic self-care tactics (food, sleep, hydration, etc.)
  • Connecting with audiences in more personal and genuine ways
  • Developing coping skills
  • Active listening, acknowledge realistically and offer concrete advice
  • If you suspect something, express something
  • His suggestions for systemic changes in educational and professional environments
  • Help others feel comfortable
  • Noa Kageyama
  • Meditation
  • Personal highlight reel
  • Achievement/Gratitude journaling
  • Baby steps
  • Taking every day as it comes

LINKS:

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  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Jul 24, 2018

TBJ90: New Seraph Brass trumpeter Raquel Rodriquez on her new gig at UNT, traveling to the Lieksa Brass Week and recovering from a chop sunburn.

Raquel Rodriquez is the newly appointed Assistant Professor of Trumpet at the University of North Texas (Fall of 2018). Prior to that, she was the Assistant Professor of Trumpet at Tennessee Tech University. Dr. Rodriquez maintains a versatile career as a performing artist, clinician, educator, and scholar. She has performed throughout China, Europe, the United Kingdom, Australia, and the United States. Raquel is a member of Seraph Brass, a brass quintet comprised of top female brass players in North America. The group performs frequently around the country and abroad.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • Sunburn
  • How her kindergarten teacher (Mrs. Hogan, from Kermit, Texas) re-routed the pronunciation of her name
  • Growing up in west Texas
  • Starting on trumpet in beginner band, getting into in high school marching band
  • Her band director got her taking lessons, even drove her there, listening to great brass recordings along the way
  • Growing up in a small Texas town
  • The influence of great music teachers
  • Getting a degree in music education and the influence of DCI and marching bands
  • Marching with Star of Indiana/Brass Theater/Blast
  • Getting her doctorate at UNT
  • The transition from Star of Indiana to Brass Theater to Blast
  • Performance anxiety
  • Lance's beta-blocker rant
  • "Trumpet players are neurotic"
  • "All trumpet players are glory hounds"
  • Heading to the Lieksa Brass Week in Finland with Seraph Brass, a sextet
  • The difficulty of balancing busy schedules with playing chamber music
  • ITG in 2019 with Seraph (as a sextet) in Miami
  • Her new gig as Assistant Professor of Trumpet at UNT, along with Caleb Hudson and John Holt (on the classical side)

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

 

 

Jul 10, 2018

TBJ89: David Gordon of the Seattle Symphony on Boston, Mahler and giving it your all.

David Gordon, whose playing has been described as “spectacular” by the Chicago Tribune, is Principal Trumpet of the Seattle Symphony and Chicago's Grant Park Symphony Orchestra.

As a soloist, Gordon has appeared with the symphony orchestras of Seattle, Grant Park, and Charleston (with whom he performed as soloist every season of his tenure), the National Repertory Orchestra and the Lake George Chamber Orchestra. He has performed as Principal Trumpet of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, and has also performed, recorded and toured as Principal Trumpet of the London Symphony Orchestra and as Trompette Solo of the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • How playing with Mahler 2 with Andrew early on changed his life
  • Studied at Columbia (Philosophy) and Juilliard
  • Won Charleston and Grant Park gig right out of school, Seattle Symphony three years later, all Principal Trumpet
  • Studies with Nato and Jim Pandolfi (TOUGH LOVE!)
  • "He'll make you great or make you quit"
  • Giving it your all
  • Studies with Vacchiano
  • Playing alongside great players early on
  • Hearing recordings of Phil Smith's playing as an early influence
  • The influence of Boston, a wave of pros-to-be
  • Is there a "Boston" equivalent of today?
  • Auditioning for Seattle (twice) at 24 and 25, hardest audition ever, an hour to play everything, close to fifty pieces in total, for Gerard Schwarz
  • Playing for Boulez
  • Mental challenges vs. physical in that audition
  • Ramped up the intensity of preparation for the second one
  • The importance of focus
  • Budgeting his time and effort
  • Playing under Schwarz
  • Would you hire you?

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

 

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