Info

The Brass Junkies Podcast - Pedal Note Media

The Brass Junkies, hosted by former Boston Brass members Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke, features interviews with the best and brightest brass players in the world. Subject matter includes everything from the serious to the ridiculous, just like the music business.
RSS Feed
The Brass Junkies Podcast - Pedal Note Media
2019
April
March
February
January


2018
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: 2019
Apr 16, 2019

Richard A. White is the subject of the upcoming documentary, "R.A.W. Tuba" and is one of our most inspirational guests. He spoke with us about his life, his career, and the upcoming film.

From his website:

With over two decades of performing on the world’s classical music stages, tubist Richard White has matured into a musician known for his clear sound and stylistic flexibility. He began his tuba studies with Ed. Goldstein at age twelve at The Baltimore School for the Performing Arts, where he graduated with honors. He then went to the Peabody Conservatory of Music to study with David Fedderly (Principal Tubist, Baltimore Symphony) where he received his Bachelor’s degree. On the advice of Mr. Fedderly, Richard traveled to Indiana University to study with the legendary Professor Daniel Perantoni. He continued his studies there receiving both his Master’s and Doctoral degrees. Richard Antoine White, also known as RawTuba, is the first African American, to receive a DM in Tuba!

Dr. White held the position of Principal Tubist with the New Mexico Symphony Orchestra from 2004 until it’s untimely demise in 2011 and is currently in his seventh season as Principal Tubist of the New Mexico Philharmonic. Dr. White is also principal tubist with The Santa Fe Symphony and Chorus. Richard enjoys playing in the Duo, Diversity Matters, with pianist Pamela Viktoria Pyle, in addition to teaching at the University of New Mexico, where he is Associate Professor of tuba/euphonium, and Associate Director of the Spirit Marching Band. Dr. White has performed with the Canadian Brass Quintet, Indiana University Faculty Brass Quintet, New Mexico Symphony Brass Quintet, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Colorado Symphony Orchestra, Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, Malaysian Philharmonic, Santa Fe Opera, Sphinx Symphony, Spoleto Music Festival U.S.A., Music in the Mountains, a summer festival located in beautiful Durango, CO, and many others. Dr. White is an Adams Artist and performs exclusively on these instruments.

Prior to moving to New Mexico, Dr. White was one of the top freelance musicians in the Indianapolis area, where he recorded with such greats as movie film composer John Williams, Cincinnati Pops conductor Eric Kunzel, and the late great wind ensemble conductor Frederik Fennell. Throughout his musical and educational career development, Dr. White has had a passionate interest in motivational speaking. That dream has recently materialized itself with the launching of his website rawtuba.com. Sharing inspirational thoughts and philosophies that have motivated Dr. White has taken him to Mexico, South America, Europe, South East Asia and across the United States of America – with more engagements on the horizon.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • How the "R.A.W. Tuba" film came about
  • Bringing love to Baltimore
  • The filming process
  • Mr. P and his stool
  • Having a literary agent
  • Richard's story
  • The water fountain
  • The emotional toll it has taken on him
  • Sam Pilafian's influence
  • Building himself a gig at UNM by teaching football players respiratory function
  • A kid named King playing a young Richard in the film
  • Breaking into the filmmaker's car (with permission)
  • Screenings always open with some sort of act
  • Short intro followed by the film, a performance, a Q&A and performance of "We Are the World"
  • Ed Goldstein and Dave Fedderly
  • Meeting his natural father in Baltimore at a screening
  • R.A.W. Tuba t-shirts
  • Working with J.D. Shaw at UNM
  • Playing in Brass Theater
  • Breathing Gym
  • His gig at UNM
  • The importance of the hang
  • Three rules for his studio: have fun, sound good, make music
  • Motivational speaking
  • Hustle and Flow
  • Diversifying his professional portfolio
  • Losing 64 lbs. and reclaiming his health
  • Doing the right thing and behaving with integrity
  • Loyalty
  • Posting the rejection letters on his walls and ceiling

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Apr 2, 2019

TBJ108: Jim "Don't call me BB" Nova on writing, driving and April Fooling. 

Pittsburgh Symphony trombonist Jim Nova puts up with more abuse from Andrew & Lance for no good reason. 

From his website:

My love for all musical things Star Wars began a long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away… As a six-year-old child, my father took my brother and me to see The Empire Strikes Back. Even at that age, I was overwhelmed with how important the music was to the storytelling, and thus began my lifelong love of the incredible scores of John Williams.

A few years later, at age nine, I began playing the trombone in my home state of Connecticut. As a child, I received my early musical exposure and training from my father, Anesti Nova. During high school, I studied with my first private trombone teacher, Assistant Principal/Second Trombonist of the Hartford Symphony, George Sanders.

After graduating high school I attended the prestigious Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia where I received my bachelor’s degree studying with Glenn Dodson, who was Philadelphia Orchestra’s Principal Trombonist at the time. This is where the seed of this album A Fall from Light to Dark first began to grow. When I was a student at Curtis, Mr. Dodson would hold epic trombone get-togethers called, “Bone Bashes” where the Curtis trombone students and the Philadelphia Orchestra trombone section would play through incredible arrangements and transcriptions of all kinds of pieces. This where I first started to create my own trombone ensemble arrangements and transcriptions. Mr. Dodson’s Han Solo-like swagger was contagious as we would tackle these pieces.

I then moved to Boston to pursue a Master’s Degree on a full scholarship at the New England Conservatory of Music, studying with Norman Bolter who was Second Trombonist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Principal Trombone of the Boston Pops Orchestra at the time. It was during this time that Mr. Bolter fostered my “Start with what you can do” attitude that I still use today, in both my own artistic development as well as with my students. He truly was and still is, my master Yoda in so many ways.

After finishing my master’s degree, I freelanced in Boston for several years, substituting on a regular basis with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Boston Pops Orchestra, making several recordings and television broadcasts with both groups as both principal and second trombone. It was here in Boston that my musical path first crossed with John Williams! I had the opportunity to perform with him on countless Boston Pops concerts and even performed on the world concert premiere of the concert suite from Star Wars Episode 1: The Phantom Menace.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • The Bubble Butt Strikes Back
  • The joke is on...?
  • Parker soprano trombone mouthpiece
  • Juilliard gig with Joe Alessi
  • 40th "Trombone at the Movies" gig, featuring film music trombone choir arrangements at colleges and universities
  • Soundcloud page has passed 750,000 listens
  • ITF closing concert in summer of 2019 with full concert versions of the same music
  • A "Who's Who" of amazing players on the ITF
  • Christopher Bill crashing in his basement and an upcoming collaboration debuting May the Fourth
  • Context is everything
  • His evolving relationship with Joe Alessi
  • Boston Brass Fanfare Project
  • Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University, with a real-live Pappert Person
  • Cathy Heller's podcast, "Don't Keep Your Day Job"
  • Jim's cat is a coffee model
  • Jim's lead foot
  • Less horsepower than a horse
  • Play in a big orchestra, drive a fast car
  • He took off like a stabbed rat
  • Paying for a ticket with a ticket
  • Exhibition of speed
  • Driving at race tracks and in driving schools
  • Becoming a performance driving teacher
  • Taking possession of his BMW while on tour with the PSO
  • The Green Death
  • Parallels between learning driving and learning trombone
  • Jimmy James

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Mar 19, 2019
Christopher is a trombonist, singer, and multi-instrumentalist based outside of NYC, but it’s more accurate to say he’s based on the internet. He has been playing piano since he was 6 years old, trombone since he was 10, and he has been composing/arranging since he was 12.
 
Christopher has a Bachelor of Music for classical trombone performance from the SUNY Purchase Conservatory of Music in New York. While at the conservatory he studied with critically acclaimed trombonists Weston Sprott (Metropolitan Opera), Denson Paul-Pollard (Metropolitan Opera), John Fedchock (Grammy Nominated Jazz Trombonist), and the absolutely incomparable Timothy Albright.
Christopher is best known for his all-trombone arrangements of popular songs. His YouTube Channel has been gaining popularity since the spring of 2014 when a cover of Pharrell Williams’ “Happy” where Christopher uses a looping station to compose the song on the spot went viral. His videos have amassed over 30 million views and a following of over 175,000 subscribers. In April of 2014, Christopher independently released his first cover album, Breakthrough, which was followed by his Christmas album, Smiling’s My Favorite. More recently, Christopher released an original pop album called Half Man, Half Machine which mixes acoustic sounds with electronic instruments. He is the Youth Workshop Coordinator of the International Trombone Festival and a marketing consultant for the International Trombone Association.
 
Christopher enjoys a busy schedule of performances, clinics, and masterclasses. In addition to producing a new video every Saturday for his YouTube Channel, he often performs at festivals such as the American Trombone Workshop, Midwest Clinic, Texas Bandmasters Association, Con Brio Festivals, Conn-Selmer Institute, Western International Band Clinic, and the International Trombone Festival.
 
In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:
  • Household name status (in Andrew's house)
  • Recording in Andrew's basement
  • Starting out exactly eight years ago as a freshman in college
  • When it stopped being so cringy
  • How his arranging chops have changed over time
  • Using homework for fun and profit
  • Using the arrangements to further develop as a musician
  • The impact of shirt color in his arrangements
  • How far he plans in advance
  • Taking yourself seriously
  • The importance of consistent uploads
  • He hasn't missed a week in four years
  • The Jerry Seinfeld of Trombone
  • Leave Christopher's Grandmother out of this
  • Two kinds of people: those who think they're cool and those who know they're not
  • The "Take on Me" pic, (worth it)
  • Cease and Desist
  • Living off Patreon and YouTube ad revenue
  • Exploring new platforms
  • Focusing on select existing programs
  • Figuring out what content works for your audience on the various platforms
  • Sticking with it for three years before gaining traction
  • The impact of the "Happy" video on his career
  • What to do for the next project after a viral hit
  • How much is too much for an audience
  • How to do a cover without getting sued
  • Meeting some of the folks who did the originals of the covers he's made
  • Dennis Deyoung busting his hump
  • Andrew's embouchure looks like he's eating a ham sandwich

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Mar 5, 2019

Legendary trumpeter Jim Pandolfi has one of the most amazing stories in music. Or most places.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • How Andrew and Jim first met in NYC many moons ago
  • Applesauce
  • Life out on Cape Cod (in the Dagobah System)
  • "The older I get, the better I was"
  • 15 years playing with The Met (wearing telescoping glasses due to an eye condition, macular degeneration)
  • Having to leave before his vision loss got too bad
  • How determination became the byword of his career
  • The impact his attitude had on the other folks around him
  • Playing loud (like really loud) in Japan on Samson and Delilah
  • Overcoming the involuntary response with excellence
  • Be a musician who happens to play the trumpet
  • Practicing golf in his apartment (between the aquarium, the big-screen TV, the piano and his horns)
  • Mark Gould locking in musically and personally
  • Surviving in a symphony orchestra (the 3 most important rules)
  • Only needed 4 or five notes to make an assessment of someone's playing
  • The development of his teaching style and philosophy
  • Everybody wants to play loud but most play too heavy (bear down too much)
  • Listening to Bryn Terfel, connecting the power coming from the reserve (feel the reserve, don't push)
  • How they get the fork to their mouth in the morning
  • Pick up your chest
  • Have the sound come from behind your sternum
  • Take pause
  • Single tonguing
  • Set and forget tonguing
  • The difference between thinking and concentration
  • How well can you concentrate?
  • Puttin' on the Ritz (during Flying Dutchman)
  • More Gould stories (with Rich Kelley cameos)
  • Peter Weller playing Clifford Brown tunes on Pandolfi's horn while driving golf balls between opera acts
  • Mel Broiles influence on Jim
  • Fantastic Mel stories (both music- and aviation-related)
  • "Mel Broiles, Starring in His Own Movie"

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

 

Feb 19, 2019

Seth had performed frequently with the Baltimore Symphony prior to assuming a full-time position in 2014 and performed during the BSO’s west coast tour and its 2010, 2014, and 2016 Carnegie Hall appearances with Marin Alsop. He can be heard on the BSO’s two most recent albums featuring the symphonies of Leonard Bernstein conducted by Marin Alsop (Naxos), as well as Ms. Alsop's recording with the Colorado Symphony of Roy Harris Symphonies 3 and 4 (Naxos). Horner has performed with the Philadelphia Orchestra, National Symphony, Kennedy Center Opera, New Jersey Symphony, Louisville Symphony, Oregon Symphony, and New World Symphony among others. He has made chamber music appearances with the Washington Symphonic Brass, the Bay Street Brassworks, and the Clipper City Brass. Horner was a featured soloist with the Capital Wind Symphony in Vienna, VA, and was a finalist at the 2010 International Tuba and Euphonium Conference.

Seth Horner has served as an audition panel member and coach for Carnegie Hall’s National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America as well as Carnegie’s NYO2. In the summer, he has been on the faculty of Wyoming Seminary’s Performing Arts Institute in Kingston, PA as the instructor of tuba and euphonium as well as performing with the Oregon Bach Festival and Britt Festival orchestras. Mr. Horner has given masterclasses at the University of Oregon, Ithaca University, and Towson University. Seth resides in Durham, NC.

In this fun and lively episode, we cover:

  • Lance is grumpy (and whelmed)
  • Seth talking to himself
  • Life is good
  • Being a professional tuba player is the best gig in the world
  • Andrew's coffee issues
  • Saints and Rams controversy
  • The Durham NC minor league baseball team (the Bulls, from Bull Durham fame)
  • His fiance found his box of mouthpieces and questioned the whole relationship
  • Mike Parker's mouthpiece issues
  • Seth's grandfather was a tuba player, had a family band
  • Andrew's most recent Jacob's Podcast episode about an influential Rex Martin class and the influence of the mouthpiece selection
  • Tage Larsen of the Chicago Symphony
  • Chris Hall and Chris Hall
  • Don't pick a fight with a child or an animal
  • Playing in the Baltimore Symphony for three seasons after David Fedderly's retirement
  • Studying with Fedderly
  • Baltimore Brass Company (and how it compared to working with the BSO)
  • Dave Fedderly: Action-packed with wisdom
  • The most important teacher of music is life
  • The importance of phrasing and sub-phrasing
  • Playing with the North Carolina Symphony
  • Playing for elementary school students all over North Carolina
  • How the state supports the organization
  • Bubble Butt
  • Turning down a military band position
  • Trusting your gut
  • Meeting Andrew at the Greensboro tuba conference (Lance was there too)
  • The Captain's Log

LINKS:

https://www.sethhorner.com/

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Feb 5, 2019

TBJ103: Joe Lovinsky, horn phenom, discusses his time in the Army band, being a sharp-shooter, cage fighter, and ultra runner. Yes really. 100-Mile Joe!

Joe Lovinsky is an amazing player, teacher, and person. He sits down with Andrew & Lance to discuss why he may, in fact, be the most interesting man in the world!

From his bio page:

Joseph Lovinsky, principal horn and frequent soloist of the Maryland Symphony Orchestra, was appointed to this position by world-renowned horn soloist Barry Tuckwell.  Lovinsky, the former principal horn of The United States Army Band “Pershing’s Own” as well as The Army Orchestra, and The Army Brass Quintet in Washington DC, was also a frequent soloist with those ensembles. From 2013-2018, Joe taught at the Shenandoah Conservatory at Shenandoah University in Winchester, Virginia, where he was a member of both the Faculty Brass and Wind Quintets.  Joseph was horn instructor of the 2014 Music for All Summer Symposium at Ball State University and the 2016 Chamber Music National Festival in Indianapolis, Indiana. Joseph Lovinsky is a "Yamaha Performing Artist." 

"You'll never know how far you can go unless you try to go too far" 

Joseph Lovinsky, Play Without Limits 

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • Joe's nervousness
  • Playing Principal horn in Pershing's Own Army Band for over 20 years
  • The various amazing players who played in the Army Band Brass Quintet over the years
  • The Amazing Harry Watters
  • Joe's joke
  • iPad music reader fail
  • Empire Brass story, signals crossed
  • JD Shaw joining the quintet in a very special piece of performance art
  • Battle of the Bands
  • Playing in a variety of smaller orchestras in Florida while in "retirement"
  • Joanna Hersey texting Joe (to warn him?)
  • Difference between playing in orchestras vs. quintets
  • Work on endurance and technical ability for quintet playing
  • Being homeless while a student at Juilliard due to a student loan glitch (and fantastic Peter Mennin story), sleeping in a practice room
  • Studying with James Chambers
  • Joe's sister is a Federal Prosecutor
  • Leaving Curtis to go to Juilliard
  • Growing up in inner-city Miami (Liberty City)
  • Being a security guard at Trump Plaza and Trump Tower
  • Celebrity sightings
  • Johnny Carson
  • Woody English
  • No downside to being a nice person
  • The influence of Joe's Dad, especially his character
  • Joe's other fascinating (and wildly successful) siblings
  • Cage fighting for fun and profit
  • John Delancey (head of Curtis) calling him into his office and changing his life
  • Becoming an ultra-runner

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Jan 22, 2019

Classical Trumpeter and Gold Medal Global Music Award Winner Mary Elizabeth Bowden has been described by Gramophone Magazine as “brilliant” and “radiant in new repertoire for trumpet.” Bowden, a Yamaha Performing Artist, is highly regarded for her artistry and virtuosity as a soloist and has been praised for the clarity, purity, and power of her sound. Bowden released her debut album, “Radiance”, on Summit Records featuring new American works. She has been featured on MPR’s “New Classical Tracks” with Julie Amacher, which is being aired on NPR stations nationwide.

Bowden’s 2018-19 performance highlights include solo performances at the Maspalomas International Trumpet Festival in Gran Canaria and at Lieksa Brass Week in Finland. She will also perform as a soloist with the Kassia Ensemble, Chrysalis Chamber Players, Richmond Philharmonic, and will make her Vancouver and New York City recital debuts. She will release her second solo album through Summit Records with the Kassia Ensemble.

Bowden is the First Prize winner of the International Women’s Brass Conference Trumpet Competition. She has performed as a soloist with Montana’s Big Sky Festival, Evansville Philharmonic, Peninsula Symphony (California), Laredo Philharmonic Orchestra, Croatian Army Wind Band at the Velika Gorica Brass Festival, Festival Amadeus Strings (Montana), Springfield Symphony (Missouri), Naples Symphony, Fifth Avenue Chamber Orchestra (Florida), Richmond Philharmonic Orchestra, San Juan Symphony, Springfield (Ohio) Symphony Orchestra and New Haven Chamber Orchestra, among several others. She has performed with trumpet soloist Jouko Harjanne at the Lieksa Brass Week in Finland, where she also served on the jury of the Lieksa International Trumpet Competition. At The Banff Center in Alberta, Canada, she performed Vivaldi’s Concerto for 2 Trumpets with trumpeters Jens Lindemann and Ryan Anthony. She was also awarded the Public Prize from the Perrenoud Foundation International Music Competition. Bowden frequently performs in recital both in solo programs and as the Dash Duo with her husband, trumpeter David Dash. Bowden and Dash teach at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, Dash as the Assistant Professor of Trumpet and Bowden as a Resident Artist.

Bowden is a founding member of both Seraph Brass and the Chrysalis Chamber Players, a recipient of a Yale Alumni Grant. Seraph will be a guest ensemble at the 2019 International Trumpet Guild Conference in Miami and was the featured ensemble at the International Women’s Brass Conference in 2017 and at the Lieksa Brass Week in Finland in 2017 and 18. They released their debut album, “Asteria,” through Summit Records in 2018, which has been awarded a Silver Medal Global Music Award. Bowden has collaborated in chamber music programs at the Marlboro Music Festival, Lakes Area Music Festival, The Banff Centre, and at the Sydney Opera House under the baton of Håkan Hardenberger. She has served on the adjunct faculty of Virginia Commonwealth University and at The Curtis Institute of Music’s Young Artist Summer Program.

An experienced orchestral musician, Bowden is currently Principal Trumpet of the Artosphere Festival Orchestra and a member of the Iris Orchestra. She has served as Principal Trumpet of the Sarasota Opera Orchestra, Lakes Area Music Festival Orchestra, New Zealand’s Auckland Philharmonia, the Daejeon Philharmonic in Korea, and with Seraphic Fire’s Firebird Chamber Orchestra. At the Lucerne Festival in Switzerland, she held the principal chair in Pierre Boulez’s performance of Mahler’s Symphony No. 6, which was released on CD in 2011. The Luzerner Zeitung described her playing in one word – “outstanding.” Bowden is also a member of the Richmond Symphony Orchestra. She has also performed many dates on Adele’s 2016 North American tour.

Bowden began full-time college studies at the age of 14, receiving an Associate degree from the Joliet Junior College. Subsequently, she earned her Bachelor of Music degree from The Curtis Institute of Music, where she studied with the principal trumpeter of the Philadelphia Orchestra, David Bilger. She was awarded her Master of Music degree in 2006 from the Yale School of Music where she studied on a full scholarship with trumpeter Allan Dean.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • Hanging in Naples Florida
  • Her new teaching gig at Shenandoah Conservatory
  • The application process for Shenandoah
  • The importance of networking
  • Lieksa Brass Week
  • Five Year Goals
  • Consortium project for Seraph Brass and Wind Ensemble
  • Recording in Lieksa
  • Crowdfunding the recording project via Indiegogo, raising over $26K(!!!)
  • Adding a trumpet player to Seraph Brass
  • How to plan for the Seraph seasons and projects
  • Memorization
  • Upcoming solo album, "Reverie," pre-order available on her site
  • Recording with the Pittsburgh-based Kassia Ensemble
  • Working with Rick DeJonge (frequently tortured pal of Andrew & Lance) on the arrangements for the album
  • Choosing to release on Summit Records
  • The current breakdown of her schedule
  • Touring and performing with her husband as the Dash Duo
  • Consortium for a new trumpet concerto
  • Working with a composer on a new work
  • "Challenge Accepted"
  • The importance of risk-taking
  • How and when to say no to gigs and opportunities
  • Better to say no upfront than to back out later

LINKS:

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

Jan 8, 2019

Joe Jackson was born in Dallas, Texas into a musical family; his mother is a former professional clarinetist, and his father, Jim Jackson, a former trombonist with the Fort Worth Symphony, is today a renown recording engineer.

Joe chose the trombone at age 12, and during his high school years was the recipient of three Down Beat Magazine “DeeBee” awards. During his tenure at the University of North Texas, Joe studied with Vern Kagarice, Hal Galper, David Liebman, and Don “Jake” Jacoby, played lead & jazz trombone in the famed One O’Clock Lab Band, and was named the National Association of Jazz Educators 1985 College Musician of the Year.

Joe left UNT in 1990 to join the Maynard Ferguson Band. He spent a year with Ferguson, performing throughout the United States and in Europe. From 1991 to 2011 he was lead trombonist with the U.S. Air Force Airmen of Note, and from 2004 to 2011 was the Director of the Airmen of Note. During his tenure as Director, Joe produced the award-winning Jazz Heritage Series heard on 112 radio and media stations worldwide, and eight recordings including “Cool Yule” which climbed to #2 on the JazzWeek chart in December 2010.

As a freelance trombonist and arranger, Joe performs with top East Coast bands including the Woody Herman Orchestra, the David Liebman Big Band & Chaise Lounge.  Additionally, he performs regularly in DC-area theatre productions and is in high demand as a session player. He has contributed hundreds of commissioned arrangements to dozens of ensembles across the country, and his educational arrangements are published by Alfred Music.  Joe has appeared as a clinician & soloist at music festivals across the country.

Joe publishes his website dedicated to serving the trombone community, www.jazztbone.com.

In this fun and lively discussion, we cover:

  • Euphonium buyback program
  • Tubas with kickstands
  • Swiss Army Knife Gig Machine Person (SAKGMP)
  • Joe's parents
  • Recording with his Dad and the Airmen of Note
  • Getting recycled in basic training
  • "The Terrible Airman" march
  • Basic training philosophy
  • The value in extending his stay in San Antonio
  • The day the drill instructors found out you would outrank them
  • OICU812
  • Sorry A**-ed Individual
  • Downbeat Magazine DB awards
  • The impact and influence of Joe's band directors
  • The Airmen of Note
  • Selling candy
  • "Choir, stand up."
  • Playing with Maynard Ferguson Band
  • A Tale of Two Airmen
  • Becoming the director of the Airmen of Note 2004-2011
  • Programming themed CDs
  • Recording live CDs, especially "Airmen of Note, Live"
  • Glenn Miller
  • "Cool Yule"
  • Growing where you're planted
  • Advantages/disadvantages of having an officer in charge
  • "Earl Williams Trombones, Out of Business Since 1973"
  • Where Joe is playing these days
  • Percentage of classical vs. jazz playing in Joe's current life
  • "Like Wes, but with affirming parents"
  • Joe's transcription work

LINKS:

Joe's site

Want to help the show? Here are some ways:

  • Help others find the show by leaving a rating and review on iTunes.
  • Show us some love on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.
  • Help us pay the bills (and get regular bonus episodes!) by becoming a Patreon patron.
  • Show some love to our sponsors: The brass program at The Mary Pappert School of Music at Duquesne University and Parker Mouthpieces (including the Andrew Hitz and Lance LaDuke models.)
  • Tell your friends!

Expertly produced by Will Houchin with love, care, and enthusiasm.

1